Preserving Our History: The 2018 DAR Calendar

Written by: Ann Dillon, President General
September 25, 2017

By now many of you have received the 2018 DAR Wall Calendar, which is the feature of our Current Campaign in support of the NSDAR General Fund. This lovely edition showcases early American fashions that were featured in one of our recent museum exhibits, titled “An Agreeable Tyrant”: Fashion After the Revolution.

This exhibition featured 50 mannequins in 12 period rooms sporting men’s and women’s clothing from 1780–1825. “An Agreeable Tyrant” reflected the creative spirit of Early America, illustrating how our first settlers forged a new identity in various ways, including fashion.

Many of the fashion pieces and accessories featured in this calendar were donated by our members. Several of them have since been restored with the conservation efforts funded by specific States and Chapters. Still other pieces were acquired by the DAR Museum to augment our collection. All of this is done so that historic collections like these may be shared with Daughters and visitors for generations to come.

The DAR Museum, with its wonderful patriotic exhibits, is just one of many programs made possible through your support of the NSDAR General Fund.

A lot of work goes into the planning, photography and production of our annual calendars so that we may share a slice of this incredible complex of buildings with members all across our nation. For those of you who have never been to Headquarters, or have not been here in a long time, each wall calendar offers us a chance to bring a little bit 1776 D Street to you.


Ribbed silk taffeta dress with satin trim and modern ribbon waistband Note: Zig-zag elements were named (and misspelled) “vandykes” after Anthony Van Dyck, the Flemish portrait painter whose subjects often wore lace collars with similarly shaped edges.

Ribbed silk taffeta dress with satin trim and modern ribbon waistband Note: Zig-zag elements were named (and misspelled) “vandykes” after Anthony Van Dyck, the Flemish portrait painter whose subjects often wore lace collars with similarly shaped edges.

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Gold watch chain, c. 1770; watch seal with engraved amethyst, late 18th century.

Gold watch chain, c. 1770; watch seal with engraved amethyst, late 18th century.

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A changeable silk taffeta vest with silk cord trim and buttons, a braided straw hat with silk satin ribbon and a parasol with woven checked cotton, metal frame, ivory handle and tip.

A changeable silk taffeta vest with silk cord trim and buttons, a braided straw hat with silk satin ribbon and a parasol with woven checked cotton, metal frame, ivory handle and tip.

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This Chinese silk damask fabric was woven in about 1710–1720 and surely made into a dress at that time. The silk was un-stitched and remade probably several times over the next hundred years before being made into the dress featured here.

This Chinese silk damask fabric was woven in about 1710–1720 and surely made into a dress at that time. The silk was un-stitched and remade probably several times over the next hundred years before being made into the dress featured here.

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Green striped silk coat over a silk satin embroidered waistcoat believed to be the wedding waistcoat of Thomas Rumrill in 1795. The brass monocle or “quizzing glass” was possibly owned by Major Joseph Savage.

Green striped silk coat over a silk satin embroidered waistcoat believed to be the wedding waistcoat of Thomas Rumrill in 1795. The brass monocle or “quizzing glass” was possibly owned by Major Joseph Savage.

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Short gown with John Guest’s label in the collar, possibly worn by his sister, Elizabeth Guest Evans (or possibly Margaret Evans Chandler, his niece). Head wrap, as worn by African- American women, both enslaved and free.

Short gown with John Guest’s label in the collar, possibly worn by his sister, Elizabeth Guest Evans (or possibly Margaret Evans Chandler, his niece). Head wrap, as worn by African- American women, both enslaved and free.

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The delicacy of sheer silk net and gauze dresses fit the aesthetic of the light, flowing styles of the turn of the century. The gauze has been woven with a larger scale floral design for the lower part of the skirt.

The delicacy of sheer silk net and gauze dresses fit the aesthetic of the light, flowing styles of the turn of the century. The gauze has been woven with a larger scale floral design for the lower part of the skirt.

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This slide show features just a few of the photos from the 2018 DAR Wall Calendar. Be sure to get your own copy of the calendar to see them all.

If you received your 2018 DAR Wall Calendar and have made a donation to the General Fund, I thank you. If you received the calendar, but have yet to make a donation, I hope you will take a moment to support our efforts.

If you did not receive the wall calendar, but would like one, please contact the Office of Development via email or call them at (800) 449-1776. Supplies are limited, so don’t miss out on this beautiful wall calendar.

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Through restoring historic properties, funding scholarships and supporting our troops, DAR makes a difference in local communities.