Celebrating Women's History Month at the DAR Museum

Written by: Hayley Prihoda, Assistant Curator of Education
April 18, 2018

Since 1987, the United States has recognized March as Women’s History Month. As a women’s service organization, this is one of our favorite months of the year! This year, in partnership with the DAR Library, DAR Archives and National Museum of Women in the Arts, the DAR Museum hosted a “Women’s History Day” to honor women’s contributions to the American story. The celebration attracted nearly 200 men, women, and children and brought necessary attention to some of the familiar and unfamiliar women that have helped define our national history.

“Women’s History Day” recognized women’s achievements as artists, scientists, suffragists, explorers, spies, historians, and First Ladies through games, tours, and crafts. Each station highlighted a notable American woman from the field and featured a related activity. Check out the photographs for some of the event highlights! 


Visitors created “Votes for Women” sashes and took photographs in our Women’s Suffrage Parade photo booth. Organized by DAR Daughter Alice Paul and Lucy Burns, the Women’s Suffrage Parade took place in Washington, D.C. on March 3, 1913 (exactly 105 years before our event!)

Visitors created “Votes for Women” sashes and took photographs in our Women’s Suffrage Parade photo booth. Organized by DAR Daughter Alice Paul and Lucy Burns, the Women’s Suffrage Parade took place in Washington, D.C. on March 3, 1913 (exactly 105 years before our event!)

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Visitors created “Votes for Women” sashes and took photographs in our Women’s Suffrage Parade photo booth. Organized by DAR Daughter Alice Paul and Lucy Burns, the Women’s Suffrage Parade took place in Washington, D.C. on March 3, 1913 (exactly 105 years before our event!)

Visitors created “Votes for Women” sashes and took photographs in our Women’s Suffrage Parade photo booth. Organized by DAR Daughter Alice Paul and Lucy Burns, the Women’s Suffrage Parade took place in Washington, D.C. on March 3, 1913 (exactly 105 years before our event!)

View Photo

Educators from the National Museum of Women in the Arts helped visitors create their own mini-museums by selecting works by women artists and building a flip-book. In keeping with their #5WomenArtists campaign, the activity encouraged participants to learn the names of women artists, such as Chakaia Booker, Louise Dahl-Wolfe, Georgia Mills Jessup, Lucy M. Lewis, Sarah Miriam Peale, Amy Sherald, and Alma Woodsey Thomas.

Educators from the National Museum of Women in the Arts helped visitors create their own mini-museums by selecting works by women artists and building a flip-book. In keeping with their #5WomenArtists campaign, the activity encouraged participants to learn the names of women artists, such as Chakaia Booker, Louise Dahl-Wolfe, Georgia Mills Jessup, Lucy M. Lewis, Sarah Miriam Peale, Amy Sherald, and Alma Woodsey Thomas.

View Photo

Educators from the National Museum of Women in the Arts helped visitors create their own mini-museums by selecting works by women artists and building a flip-book. In keeping with their #5WomenArtists campaign, the activity encouraged participants to learn the names of women artists, such as Chakaia Booker, Louise Dahl-Wolfe, Georgia Mills Jessup, Lucy M. Lewis, Sarah Miriam Peale, Amy Sherald, and Alma Woodsey Thomas.

Educators from the National Museum of Women in the Arts helped visitors create their own mini-museums by selecting works by women artists and building a flip-book. In keeping with their #5WomenArtists campaign, the activity encouraged participants to learn the names of women artists, such as Chakaia Booker, Louise Dahl-Wolfe, Georgia Mills Jessup, Lucy M. Lewis, Sarah Miriam Peale, Amy Sherald, and Alma Woodsey Thomas.

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Visitors explored the museum in three ways: as spies solving a mystery, explorers on a scavenger hunt, or time-travelers on a docent-guided tour. Each experience encouraged attendees to visit the museum period rooms to learn about the way American homes and lifestyles have changed throughout the years.

Visitors explored the museum in three ways: as spies solving a mystery, explorers on a scavenger hunt, or time-travelers on a docent-guided tour. Each experience encouraged attendees to visit the museum period rooms to learn about the way American homes and lifestyles have changed throughout the years.

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Visitors explored the museum in three ways: as spies solving a mystery, explorers on a scavenger hunt, or time-travelers on a docent-guided tour. Each experience encouraged attendees to visit the museum period rooms to learn about the way American homes and lifestyles have changed throughout the years.

Visitors explored the museum in three ways: as spies solving a mystery, explorers on a scavenger hunt, or time-travelers on a docent-guided tour. Each experience encouraged attendees to visit the museum period rooms to learn about the way American homes and lifestyles have changed throughout the years.

View Photo

Visitors explored the museum in three ways: as spies solving a mystery, explorers on a scavenger hunt, or time-travelers on a docent-guided tour. Each experience encouraged attendees to visit the museum period rooms to learn about the way American homes and lifestyles have changed throughout the years.

Visitors explored the museum in three ways: as spies solving a mystery, explorers on a scavenger hunt, or time-travelers on a docent-guided tour. Each experience encouraged attendees to visit the museum period rooms to learn about the way American homes and lifestyles have changed throughout the years.

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Seed dispersal and pH experiments introduced museum visitors to the work of female scientists like Alice Ball, who developed a treatment for leprosy that was used for over 20 years.

Seed dispersal and pH experiments introduced museum visitors to the work of female scientists like Alice Ball, who developed a treatment for leprosy that was used for over 20 years.

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Seed dispersal and pH experiments introduced museum visitors to the work of female scientists like Alice Ball, who developed a treatment for leprosy that was used for over 20 years.

Seed dispersal and pH experiments introduced museum visitors to the work of female scientists like Alice Ball, who developed a treatment for leprosy that was used for over 20 years.

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We hope you will join us next March to recognize more inspiring American women! Be sure to keep up-to-date on our latest events by following us on Facebook or checking our Calendar of Events on the DAR Museum website. 

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