Celebrate 125! Monday

Written by: Lynn Young, President General
August 3, 2015

We are only a couple months away from the 125th anniversary of the founding of our Society on October 11 and so I wanted to take the opportunity to use this time to share even more stories of our amazing past. Starting today, every Monday we will post on the blog a story that looks back into the 125 year history of the DAR. So keep your eye out every week for these Celebrate 125! stories and please share them with other members and the public who may not have seen them on the blog. We have such amazing stories to tell about our Society and now is the perfect opportunity to share them as we celebrate 125 years of service to America. Enjoy!

Conference on Limitations of Armament

Between November 12, 1921, and February 6, 1922, a group of representatives from various nations met in Memorial Continental Hall for a Conference on Limitations of Armament. Representatives attended from the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, India, France, Italy and Japan. The leader of the conference was U.S. Secretary of State Charles Evan Hughes. As a result of the meeting, treaties were signed between the United States, the United Kingdom, France, Italy and Japan. 

These treaties were designed to freeze and destroy armaments, to certify mutual respect for existing spheres of influence, and to recognize the independence of China. The contracting powers agreed to limit their respective naval armament.  Specific rules delineated which ships each country could have, how to scrap those vessels of war they were destroying, and the replacement of capital ships and aircraft carriers by new construction.

Following this conference, other naval arms limitation conferences sought to strengthen limitations of warship building. The terms of the Memorial Continental Hall treaty were modified by the London Naval Treaty of 1930 and the Second London Naval Treaty of 1936. By the mid-1930s, Japan and Italy renounced the treaties, making naval arms limitation an increasingly untenable position for the other signatories.

As a result of this historic arms conference, the United States Department of the Interior designated Memorial Continental Hall a national historic landmark in 1973. A plaque affixed to the north corner of the building’s exterior reads: 

MEMORIAL CONTINENTAL HALL
HAS BEEN DESIGNATED
A REGISTERED HISTORIC LANDMARK
UNDER THE PROVISIONS OF THE
HISTORIC SITES ACT OF AUGUST 21, 1935.
THIS SITE POSSESSES EXCEPTIONAL VALUE
IN COMMEMORATING OR ILLUSTRATING
THE HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SERVICE
1973

This is an A Look Back article that was featured in the January/February 2015 Daughters Newsletter. Subscribe to the newsletter here: www.dar.org/subscribe.

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